Houmas House
 Once hailed as the largest sugar-producing plantation in the country, (producing a monumental 20 million pounds of sugar each year), Houmas House Plantation was built on the site of a Houma Indian land grant. When Kevin Kelly purchased Houmas House Plantation and Gardens at auction in the late spring of 2003, the house had been off the trail of River Road tourism for a couple of years. When Kelly began his transformation of the property in the summer of that year, no part of the once-grand mansion was left untouched. It was an extreme makeover and it was disruptive. Literally no stone on the property was left unturned, and in the process, some say, a spirit was awakened. A worker from the electrician’s crew was the first to report that he had seen a young girl descending the freestanding stairway, and later in the large central hall. More recently, tour guides and guests claim to have seen a little girl, usually in the morning or later in the afternoon. Two Houmas House families have lost young daughters to illness. In 1848, the young daughter of Col. John Preston died while the family was in South Carolina. Around 1900, Col. William Porcher Miles and his wife, Harriet, lost their daughter to illness at age 7. She was laid to rest in the family cemetery. The cemetery disappeared and several of the gravesites were disturbed when the levee was built after the 1927 flood. Today, the graveyard would be located under the levee and out onto the batture. Houmas House offers Nighttime tours, Wednesday through Sunday.
Houmas House

Once hailed as the largest sugar-producing
plantation in the country, (producing a monumental 20 million pounds of sugar each year), Houmas House Plantation was built on the site of a Houma Indian land grant.

When Kevin Kelly purchased Houmas House Plantation and Gardens at auction in the late spring of 2003, the house had been off the trail of River Road tourism for a couple of years. When Kelly began his transformation of the property in the summer of that year, no part of the once-grand mansion was left untouched. It was an extreme makeover and it was disruptive. Literally no stone on the property was left unturned, and in the process, some say, a spirit was awakened.

A worker from the electrician’s crew was the first to report that he had seen a young girl descending the freestanding stairway, and later in the large central hall. More recently, tour guides and guests claim to have seen a little girl, usually in the morning or later in the afternoon.

Two Houmas House families have lost young daughters to illness. In 1848, the young daughter of Col. John Preston died while the family was in South Carolina. Around 1900, Col. William Porcher Miles and his wife, Harriet, lost their daughter to illness at age 7. She was laid to rest in the family cemetery. The cemetery disappeared and several of the gravesites were disturbed when the levee was built after the 1927 flood. Today, the graveyard would be located under the levee and out onto the batture.

Houmas House offers Nighttime tours, Wednesday through Sunday.

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