Things That Go Boom  In The Night
In Modesto, California, on October 3, 1950, a mystery explosion shattered the night with such violence that a general fire alarm was sounded for fifteen miles around.
On November 10, 1950, a thirty-mile area in the lower St. Lawrence River area, Canada, was vibrated by a mystery blast. Federal transport department officials tried to pin this one on a U.S. Air Force plane with engine trouble that dropped a bomb.
On January 4, 1952, a series of mystery blasts shook Los Angeles and San Diego. The first explosion sounded at 3:33 A.M. in the vicinity of Los Angeles’ International Airport. The second thundered forth from San Diego’s Mission Hills at 8:30 P.M., followed by a third at Point Lorna a half an hour later, and a fourth nearly two hours later in the Chula Vista region.
 On each November 12th for three years in succession, Lacey and his neighbors were shaken out of their beds by a loud explosion during the night; then upon investigation, they would discover a large crater on, or near, his farm. Lacey’s mystery blast in 1968 was the loudest and the largest of all. The noise could be heard more than twenty miles away, and the crater was eighteen feet wide and almost five feet deep. "It’s getting to be an annual affair at Howard Lacey’s place: Something goes boom in the night and leaves a hole within 300 yards of the one before," stated an Associated Press release.
A New England community, Moodus, Connecticut, has been plagued by mystery blasts for over three hundred years, baffling scientists as well as inhabitants of the village. “Moodus” is derived from the name Machemoodus, from the Wangunk, meaning “place of noises.” The Wangunk tribe made a religion out of the strange booms, believing that they were made by a spirit made angry by the European colonists settling in the area. The settlers themselves blamed the noises on the battle sounds of good and evil witches fighting for their puritanical souls.
In the summer of 1959, a violent shock, accompanied by two loud explosions, was reported in an area from one hundred miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas, to Roswell, New Mexico, two hundred miles to the southeast. In the town of Pampa, fifty-five miles northeast of Amarillo, the wall of a downtown building was cracked by the blasts.

Things That Go Boom
In The Night

  • In Modesto, California, on October 3, 1950, a mystery explosion shattered the night with such violence that a general fire alarm was sounded for fifteen miles around.
  • On November 10, 1950, a thirty-mile area in the lower St. Lawrence River area, Canada, was vibrated by a mystery blast. Federal transport department officials tried to pin this one on a U.S. Air Force plane with engine trouble that dropped a bomb.
  • On January 4, 1952, a series of mystery blasts shook Los Angeles and San Diego. The first explosion sounded at 3:33 A.M. in the vicinity of Los Angeles’ International Airport. The second thundered forth from San Diego’s Mission Hills at 8:30 P.M., followed by a third at Point Lorna a half an hour later, and a fourth nearly two hours later in the Chula Vista region.
  •  
    On each November 12th for three years in succession, Lacey and his neighbors were shaken out of their beds by a loud explosion during the night; then upon investigation, they would discover a large crater on, or near, his farm. Lacey’s mystery blast in 1968 was the loudest and the largest of all. The noise could be heard more than twenty miles away, and the crater was eighteen feet wide and almost five feet deep.
    "It’s getting to be an annual affair at Howard Lacey’s place: Something goes boom in the night and leaves a hole within 300 yards of the one before," stated an Associated Press release.

  • A New England community, Moodus, Connecticut, has been plagued by mystery blasts for over three hundred years, baffling scientists as well as inhabitants of the village. “Moodus” is derived from the name Machemoodus, from the Wangunk, meaning “place of noises.” The Wangunk tribe made a religion out of the strange booms, believing that they were made by a spirit made angry by the European colonists settling in the area. The settlers themselves blamed the noises on the battle sounds of good and evil witches fighting for their puritanical souls.

  • In the summer of 1959, a violent shock, accompanied by two loud explosions, was reported in an area from one hundred miles northeast of Amarillo, Texas, to Roswell, New Mexico, two hundred miles to the southeast. In the town of Pampa, fifty-five miles northeast of Amarillo, the wall of a downtown building was cracked by the blasts.
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